Grüne Nachrichten

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Zebra
Beiträge: 1794
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Re: Grüne Nachrichten

Beitragvon Zebra » 18. Mär 2017, 21:18

Einfach genial :).
Ich denke Paul stamets hat so einen Hut aus Pilz leder.
Faszinierend wie vielseitig Pilze sind!
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Zebra
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Re: Grüne Nachrichten

Beitragvon Zebra » 19. Mär 2017, 21:38

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Zebra
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Re: Grüne Nachrichten

Beitragvon Zebra » 12. Apr 2017, 12:23

Gasabo's Niyibaho has found gold in mushroom growing, wine making

Bild

I first met Berthilde Niyibaho during an agribusiness workshop and expo in Kigali last year, where she was selling mushroom powder and banana wine. The passion with which she was talking about her products and agro-processing, as well as youth and agribusiness, set her apart from the crowd. I visited her factory located in Gasabo recently so I could tell her story.

The genesis

The 57-year-old resident of Kacyiru sector, Gasabo District says she ventured into the business world out of need – to provide for her children, particularly ensuring a sustainable source of income to pay for their education.
Niyibaho says she started small by making banana brew in 2005. “Later, I expanded the project and embarked on mushroom farming and production,” she narrates. Her firm, BN Producers Limited, is an enterprise mix that deals in crop and animal production.
She opened her first business after completing secondary school. The enterprise has been able to thrive, thanks to her hard work and trainings by different agencies and support from the business community and government.
Niyibaho says the government, through the Rwanda Agriculture Board (RAB), helped her go for trainings in mushroom farming and processing in China. “While I was in China, I learnt that mushrooms can transform people’s lives through improved incomes and nutrition. So, when I came back, I was able to produce my own mushrooms tubes. This helped me to expand and transform the project into a fully-income driven one,” Niyibaho narrates. She adds that’s when she merged the two sections of her enterprise – brewing and mushroom growing – “because mushrooms had not yet started generating income in money”.

Lessons from Holland

In 2010, Niyibaho was selected by Rwanda Development Board’s Centre for Support to Small-and-Medium Enterprises for training in the Netherlands on how to make mushroom seeds.
“This was a huge boost as we could now access seeds locally and cut on import expenses. Previously, we used to import mushroom seeds from China,” she says.
She notes that when she returned, she set up a modern seed-making facility and food testing laboratory with help of her husband, who is knowledgeable in civil engineering.

Production and marketing

The enterprise has the capacity to produce 46,400 cartons of banana wine and 120,000 mushroom tubes per year, as well as 65,625 kilogrammes of fresh mushrooms and 6562.5 kilogrammes of dried mushrooms and mushroom powder per year.
The firm sells a bottle of wine at Rwf1,500 (factory) and between Rwf2,000 and Rwf2,500 retail. It makes up to Rwf18 million annually, according to the entrepreneur. Niyibaho sells her products locally, as well as in Uganda, Tanzania, and Bukavu, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. The businesswoman provides market for fish, sunflower, banana and soya bean farmers. She adds that the firm bought three tonnes of sunflower from partner farmers last year.
The farmer cum processor says the company is in process of acquiring the standardisation mark (S-MARK) and the International Standard Organisation (ISO) certification for its products to boost their competitiveness.

Employing graduates

She never went to university, but Niyibaho is proud to provide employment to skilled Rwandans and graduates, four of whom have master’s degrees, including an engineer and an agronomist in mushroom growing, as well as two food scientists.
Some of her children who are also graduates work for the firm.

Why enterprise mix

Niyibaho says she ventured into mushroom growing for home consumption, but not as a business. However, this was to change when she participated in an agriculture and livestock exhibition in August 2006, where she learnt more about mushrooms, especially their nutritional benefits. The fact that those who tasted her mushroom soups liked them also influenced her to undertake the project on a commercial basis. Now, her business aims at availing mushrooms all year round.
“My project aims at increasing nutrition and good feeding as well as hygiene and sanitation in the country. When we started in 2005, we were making two banana wine brands called Imena and Intego. We later learnt that we could use the remains of bananas to grow mushrooms besides working as organic manure. So, we introduced mushroom farming (on a small scale) in 2006,” Niyibaho explains.

More achievements

Apart from educating her children, Niyibaho says she has advanced from the old way of producing banana wine (urwagwa) to making bottled wine. “I also bought a car that facilitates delivery of our products to clients compared to when I used to carry banana brew on my head in the past,” she notes.
She says she conquered fear and stereotypes to make it in business, and advises women to avoid fear and take on business world that has traditionally been a men’s domain.
Niyibaho is happy to have trained dozens of women and other people involved in mushroom growing across the country. The factory has two separate businesses, a banana wine section and another for food processing.

Challenges

Despite the progress thus far, Niyibaho says she faces a number of challenges, including lack of modern equipment in the food processing section.
“We also lack some laboratory materials. I believe we can do much more and expand further if we secure the equipment,” the processor says. She says the road from the factory is very dusty, noting that this affects equipment and could also contaminate food products. The firm, like many others in the country, also has a challenge of packaging.
“We need modern packaging materials that can attract buyers on the regional and international market.”
Despite these challenges, Niyibaho is grateful for government support that enabled her to acquire skills in mushroom growing and processing from China and the Netherlands.

Future plans

The entrepreneur plans to join efforts geared at fighting malnutrition, and hopes to acquire more equipment to be able to process enough in quality mushroom products.

http://www.newtimes.co.rw/section/artic ... 14/208864/
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Zebra
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Re: Grüne Nachrichten

Beitragvon Zebra » 28. Apr 2017, 21:36

Can Mushrooms Save the Honey Bee? - Short Film

A blood-sucking mite is wreaking havoc on honey bees—but scientists have discovered a surprising new way to fight back.

http://www.biographic.com/posts/sto/can ... -honey-bee
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Herr von Böde
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Wohnort: Planet Earth (meist)

Re: Grüne Nachrichten

Beitragvon Herr von Böde » 18. Mai 2017, 17:05

Interessant:
http://www.grenzwissenschaft-aktuell.de ... n20170518/
Crawley (Australien) – Viele Pflanzen- und Gartenfreunde sind bereits davon überzeugt, dass ihre Zöglinge besser gedeihen, wenn man mit ihnen spricht oder ihnen gar – bevorzugt klassische – Musik vorspielt. Was bislang wissenschaftlich noch nicht nachgewiesen wurde, könnte nun durch die Beobachtung einer weiteren Studie gestützt werden. In dieser zeigt eine australische Evolutionsbiologin, dass Pflanzen offenbar tatsächlich Töne, etwa fließenden Wassers oder summender Insekten wahrnehmen können. ...
"Bildung muss immer darauf abzielen liebgewohnte Denkmuster zu erschüttern."
- Prof. Dr. Rainer Rothfuß
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Zebra
Beiträge: 1794
Registriert: 23. Jun 2015, 23:46

Re: Grüne Nachrichten

Beitragvon Zebra » 18. Mai 2017, 20:28

Danke für den Artikel, obwohl ich nun meinen Pflanzen trotzdem keine klassische Oper vorsingen werde^^


Plastic-eating caterpillar could revolutionize waste treatment
wax-worm-01-1580x549.jpg
The answer to our global plastic catastrophe may be in sight. Spanish researchers have discovered that the wax worm, a caterpillar known for munching on the wax within beehives, is able to devour and biodegrade polyethylene plastic, converting it into a form of alcohol found in antifreeze.

Federica Bertocchini, a scientist at the Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology of Cantabria, first uncovered the worm’s unique abilities by chance, when she attempted to clean up a wax worm infestation in one of her home beehives. She placed the worms in a plastic bag, tied it off, and left it in her house – only to find that the worms had chewed through the plastic and escaped.

In a new paper published in Current Biology, she describes how 100 of the worms can chew through an ordinary polyethylene shopping bag in 40 minutes. At first, Bertocchini and her colleagues assumed the worms might be simply chewing through the plastic and shredding it. But then they took slightly nauseating step of pureeing the worms and leaving the resulting paste in contact with the plastic itself.

The results were bizarre – after 14 hours in contact with the worm paste, 13 percent of the plastic had dissolved and degraded into ethylene glycol, the main component in antifreeze. Rather than simply shredding the plastic with their mouths, this showed that some compound in the worms’ digestive systems is actually breaking down and digesting the material. There have been attempts to degrade plastic before using fungus and bacteria, but none of these experiments have yielded results within a matter of hours.

This finding could revolutionize the way that we currently manage waste. At the moment, landfills around the globe are packed with polyethylene shopping bags, which take between 100-400 years to degrade naturally. If researchers can isolate the enzyme the wax worms use to digest it, they could potentially treat the plastic in landfills with the substance to help it break down faster.

http://inhabitat.com/plastic-eating-cat ... treatment/
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syzygy
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Rettet ein riesiger CO2-Sauger das Klima?

Beitragvon syzygy » 1. Jun 2017, 21:52

Die Zürcher Firma Climeworks eröffnet ihre erste CO2-Filteranlage. Bis 2025 will das Unternehmen ein Prozent der globalen CO2-Emissionen aus der Luft saugen.

Was tun, um den Klimawandel zu stoppen? Die Zürcher Firma Climeworks hat eine simple Idee: CO2 aus der Luft filtern und so den CO2-Gehalt der Atmosphäre reduzieren. 2009 gründeten die beiden ETH-Ingenieure Christoph Gebald und Jan Wurzbacher die Firma. Am Mittwoch ist nun ihre erste kommerzielle Anlage in Betrieb gegangen. Sie steht auf dem Dach der Kehrichtverbrennungsanlage in Hinwil und soll pro Jahr 900 Tonnen CO2 aus der Luft filtern.

Die Anlage in Hinwil umfasst 18 sogenannte Kollektoren, die wie grosse Lüftungsanlagen aussehen. Ventilatoren saugen dabei die Luft in den Kollektor. Dort wird das CO2 mit einem speziellen Stoff herausgefiltert. Mit der Abwärme der Kehrichtverbrennungsanlage wird das gebundene CO2 anschliessend wieder gasförmig gemacht und danach über eine Leitung konzentriert in nahe Gewächshäuser geleitet. Dort wird das Gas eingesetzt, um den Ertrag von Pflanzen wie Tomaten und Gurken um 20 Prozent zu steigern.

250'000 Anlagen geplant

Geld verdient Climeworks mit dem Verkauf von CO2. Das Gas wird etwa in der Landwirtschaft oder in der Getränkebranche (Kohlensäure) eingesetzt. Die Firma hofft zudem, dass CO2 dereinst auch für erneuerbare Treibstoffe verwendet werden kann. Bereits seit 2013 arbeitet Climeworks deshalb mit dem Autohersteller Audi zusammen.

Climeworks hat ambitionierte Ziele. Bis 2025 will das Unternehmen ein Prozent der globalen CO2-Emissionen aus der Luft filtern. Dazu wären rund 250'000 Anlagen wie in Hinwil nötig.

CO2 gehört zu jenen Stoffen, die für den Klimawandel verantwortlich gemacht werden. Soll dieser gestoppt werden, muss weniger CO2 produziert und dessen Anteil in der Atmosphäre reduziert werden. Rund hundert Staaten haben sich deshalb 2015 im sogenannten Pariser Abkommen zu verbindlichen Klimazielen verpflichtet. Ob diese aber tatsächlich umgesetzt werden, ist unklar.
Q: http://www.20min.ch/finance/news/story/23707399

http://www.tagesanzeiger.ch/wissen/natu ... y/10471811

Climeworks makes history with world-first commercial CO2 capture plant
Climeworks has launched the world’s first commercial plant that captures atmospheric CO2 for supply and sale to a customer. The Swiss direct air capture company launched the commercial-scale Direct Air Capture (DAC) plant, featuring its patented technology that filters carbon dioxide from ambient air. The plant is now supplying 900 tonnes of CO2 annually to a nearby greenhouse to help grow vegetables. The plant is a historic step for negative emissions technology – earmarked by the Paris climate agreement as being vital in the quest to limit a global temperature rise of 2 °C.

Founded by engineers, Christoph Gebald and Jan Wurzbacher, Climeworks developed its technology to capture atmospheric carbon with a filter, using mainly low-grade heat as an energy source. In Hinwil the DAC plant has been installed on the roof of a waste recovery facility – operated by the municipal administration union KEZO – with its waste heat powering the Climeworks DAC plant.

During the Climeworks capture process, CO2 is chemically deposited on the filter surface. Once the filter is saturated, the CO2 is then isolated at a temperature of about 100 °C. The pure captured CO2 gas can then be sold to customers in key markets, including: commercial agriculture, food and beverage industries, the energy sector and the automotive industry. In Hinwil, Climeworks provides a continuous supply of CO2 through an underground pipeline to a greenhouse 400m away, operated by Gebrüder Meier Primanatura AG, to assist with growing vegetables such as tomatoes and cucumbers.

By securing this supply agreement, Climeworks has ensured the Hinwil operation is the world’s first direct air capture plant with a commercial customer – an important step for the future of negative emissions technologies. The Hinwil plant will operate as a three-year demonstration project in co-operation with the partners Gebrüder Meier and KEZO, and with a contribution towards non-amortisable costs by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE).
"Um die Welt in einem Sandkorn zu sehn und den Himmel in einer wilden Blume, halte die Unendlichkeit auf deiner flachen Hand und die Stunde rückt in die Ewigkeit."
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Bosche
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Re: Grüne Nachrichten

Beitragvon Bosche » 3. Jun 2017, 10:12

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Bosche
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Re: Grüne Nachrichten

Beitragvon Bosche » 8. Jun 2017, 14:19

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Herr von Böde
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Re: Grüne Nachrichten

Beitragvon Herr von Böde » 8. Jun 2017, 17:31

Forscher entdecken rudimentäre Gehirn-ähnliche Strukturen bei Pflanzen
Birmingham (Großbritannien) – Auch Pflanzen verfügen über Zellstrukturen, deren Funktion und Aufgaben mit dem zu vergleichen sind, was man als eine Art rudimentäres „Entscheidungsfindungs-Zentrale“ bezeichnen könnte. Zu dieser überraschenden Erkenntnis kommen britische Wissenschaftler anhand ihrer Untersuchungen von Schaumkresse.(...)
"Bildung muss immer darauf abzielen liebgewohnte Denkmuster zu erschüttern."
- Prof. Dr. Rainer Rothfuß

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